Here at ShortStayApartment.com we are great fans of the Slow Food movement, and therefore we are pleased to discover the Slow Homes Movement following closely in its philosophical footprints.

Started by John Brown (registered architect, real estate broker and Professor of Architecture at the University of Calgary.) The Slow Home Movement is, in their own words:

“Slow Home is a critical and much needed alternative to the standardised world of cookie cutter houses and instant neighborhoods. Suburban sprawl is like fast food, cheap and easy but also unsatisfying and boring. These places are shallow substitutes for homes and neighborhoods with meaning and depth. They are created by big businesses that are more interested in profits rather than people. Like fast food, they are bad for us, our families, and the environment.”

Many holiday hotspots are also cause for concern, with over-development and rapid construction leaving an indelibly ugly mark on what was, originally, a beautiful corner of the Earth. Although the Slow Home movement is related mainly to real-estate we feel that this philosophy should be extended to the development of holiday resorts etc. Sensible planning and intelligent construction can satisfy tourist demand, increase value and improve well-being.

The Slow Home Philosophy “is a new design environment that will help you learn about modern residential design and how to start integrating the principles of good design into your daily life. Slow Home takes its name from the slow food movement which arose as a reaction to the processed food industry. In the same ways that slow food helps people learn how to become more familiar and involved with the food they eat, Slow Home provides design focused information to empower individuals to step beyond the too fast world of cookie cutter housing.”

The website contains more information and we recommend it to all our users who are interested in building a quality, satisfactory lifestyle based on the appreciation of harmonious surroundings and good design.

http://theslowhome.com/blog/whatisslowhome/